Some Thoughts on Star-begotten Chapters 5 & 6

This week we continue our journey with Star-begotten by H.G. Wells.  Compared to the previous chapters, this week’s chapters take the ridiculous theory of Martianization and turn it into one that the characters more seriously explore and gather data on.  However, amidst the serious inquiry, we see a mirror held up to three of humanity’s flaws: our bias based on what we know, our tendency to draw conclusions from unscientific methods, and our tendency to see what we want to see.  As per usual, the following post is simply my own opinions, and you’re welcome to draw different conclusions.

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Some Thoughts on Star-begotten Chapter 2, 3, and 4

Continuing on with “Star-begotten” by H.G. Wells, this week I made it through chapters 2, 3, and 4.  Within these chapters, we begin to see the descent of Joseph Davis into what is potentially madness.  However, the story is weaved incredibly well, making the entire scenario feel all too possible despite how ludicrous Martian cosmic rays sound.  Thus, this week, I feel it is imperative to discuss how the story establishes authority to create believability, and also what the events mean for our modern day.  As per usual, the following is just my own opinion on the story.

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Some Thoughts on Star-begotten Chapter 1

This week I decided to start a longer length story to examine for my Friday posts for a while.  As such, my analyses for these will be a bit different than the usual short story ones.  Some posts may be theories, some may be an analysis on how elements are executed, and some will be the usual talk about what it all means.  However, hopefully you will still enjoy hearing my thoughts on them.

I start my journey off with Chapter 1 of Star-begotten.  Written by H.G. Wells, the story describes itself as a tale about a man who begins to believe that aliens are invading human life in some manner.  Much of Chapter 1 is spent exploring the protagonist’s, Joseph Davis, character.  However, within this chapter we see a brilliant execution that allows for one to believe both that Joseph is innocently blind, maliciously blind, and the only one not blind to events around him.  As per usual, the following are simply my own thoughts and just one opinion of many.

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Some Thoughts on “The Story of the Inexperienced Ghost”

“The Story of the Inexperienced Ghost” by H.G. Wells is best described as a tale within a tale.  On the surface level, it is an excellent ghost story that has just that little nagging sense of creepiness to get even the most ardent of sceptics.  Underneath this, though, the story has an interesting metaphor for ghosts and people.  As per usual, the following is my own interpretation of the piece and just an opinion.

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Some Thoughts on “Impact”

Colonization is often a red button issue for many.  There is no denying that atrocities have occurred in the name of colonization, but it is equally hard to deny the fact that the world as we know it would not exist if it didn’t happen.  Regardless of which side you fall on, there is no question that colonization will continue to happen as humanity stretches its wings into space.  “Impact” by Irving Cox is one such story that tackles the topic, and through the story we learn a stark lesson about one of humanity’s more negative features.  As per usual, the following interpretation is my own, and you should form your own opinions about the story.

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Some Thoughts on “The Road from Colonus”

There is no question that getting old kind of sucks.  While some are able to greet it with a rather jovial perspective, others become grumpy or depressed at their own mortality.  The subject of getting old is at the heart of today’s analysis.  “The Road from Colonus” by E.M. Forster is a tale that reminds us getting old does not have to leave us mentally depressed, but also reminds us that we cannot escape the physical reality of aging.  As per usual, the following is my own interpretation, and I encourage you to draw your own conclusions.

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Some Thoughts on “Other Kingdom”

Is it worthwhile to learn the classics?  This is a question posed to some of the characters at the very beginning of the “Other Kingdom” by E.M. Forster.  After some debate, one of the characters poignantly says the classics teach them how to avoid things.  While the story is certainly about more than that, there is a related theme that ties in that message: the importance of escapism.  As per usual, the following is my own interpretation of the piece, and everyone is entitled to their own opinions.

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Some Thoughts on “The Colour Out of Space”

The Colour Out of Space is an intriguing tale by H.P. Lovecraft that attempts to combine two different genre aspects into one coherent story.  On the one hand, it addresses our fears of space and how we may not understand everything that comes from it.  On the other hand, it features our fear of what might lie underground in the dark that we can neither see nor comprehend.  The elements work together wonderfully.  Yet, there are also a few smaller elements worth discussing, as their presence adds a true terrifying “what if” prospect.  As per usual, this is merely my own interpretation of the story.

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Some Thoughts on “Love of Life”

“Love of Life” by Jack London is one of those stories you come away from completely horrified.  There are certain types of scenarios we know exist, and yet our minds often choose not to dwell on them.  To do so would mean to accept the true, horrific experience they would be.  “Love of Life” chooses to dwell on one of these scenarios, in this case what almost starving to death is like.  However, within this tale we examine a dark take on what it means to survive by all means necessary and what we may lose in the process.  As always, the following is my own interpretation of the story and not the only interpretation possible.

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